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Publications
Special issue of Building Research and Information
http://www.ilankelman.org/bri2004.html


Issue details:

Cover of vol. 32, no. 5 of Building Research and information, posted here with kind permission of the publisher

Full reference:

Spence, R. and I. Kelman (guest eds.). 2004. "Managing the Risks from Natural Hazards". Special issue of Building Research and Information (R. Lorch, ed.), vol. 32, no. 5. See the full issue.


Contents

Building Research & Information.
Published by Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group.
Edited by Richard Lorch.

Special Issue with Guest Editors Robin Spence and Ilan Kelman.
"Managing the Risks from Natural Hazards".
Volume 32, Number 5, September-October 2004.

"In this special issue", pp. 362 - 363.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000262165

"Editorial", pp. 364 - 367.
By Robin Spence and Ilan Kelman.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000244129

"Design of humanitarian tents for use in cold climates", pp. 368 - 378.
By Pete Manfield, Joseph Ashmore, and Tom Corsellis.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000220990

"Residential building damage and natural perils: Australian examples and issues", pp. 379 - 390.
By Russell Blong.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000221007

"Risk and regulation: can improved government action reduce the impacts of natural disasters?" pp. 391 - 402.
By Robin Spence.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000221043

"Public policy for reducing earthquake risks: a US perspective", pp. 403 - 413.
By Mary C. Comerio.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000221052

"Adapting traditional shelter for disaster mitigation and reconstruction: experiences with community-based approaches", pp. 414 - 426.
By Theo Schilderman.
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000250979

"Allocation of post-disaster reconstruction financing to housing", pp. 427 - 437.
Paul K. Freeman
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000221016

"Managing and interpreting uncertainty for climate change risk", pp. 438 - 448.
Rodney R. White
DOI: 10.1080/0961321042000221106

The Shanghai built environment.
The Shanghai built environment, subject to risks such as storm surge, wind storms, subsidence, disease, and pollution.
(Copyright Ilan Kelman 2003.)
See more Shanghai photos at
http://www.ilankelman.org/shanghai.html


Press Release

Download the press release:

News Release

September 30, 2004

Reducing the Risks from Natural Hazards

University of Cambridge academics explore solutions with Building Research and Information journal

Many of the tragic consequences of natural hazards floods, storms, and earthquakes could be avoided by better management of the risks to buildings. Two academics from the Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) are editing a special issue of Building Research and Information to highlight and explore different issues surrounding the risk for communities over their construction.

The publication will explore how over the many phases of a building's lifecycle, if is it possible to manage risks from natural hazards most effectively. Specially commissioned research papers suggest that many successes exist, but much more needs to be done. Several major lessons emerge from the research:

  • Technocratic solutions fail because they do not engage with social, economic and cultural needs. Solutions are needed which are trans-disciplinary, engage with local needs and integrate the processes of creating and using buildings

  • Education is needed for professionals (planners, designers, builders and building managers) to better understand managing risks to the built environment from the natural hazards, both technically and socially.

  • Legislation is needed to ensure that the numerous existing buildings built to older and inadequate standards are evaluated and, where necessary, strengthened.

  • New mechanisms and financial solutions are called for. Financial incentives can be provided by insurers to encourage risk mitigation activity by developers, owners and occupiers.

  • When external agencies move in to offer aid after a disaster, the affected population's existing capabilities and initiatives need to be effectively harnessed. Failure to engage with local people has resulted in inadequate interim shelter and inappropriate long-term reconstruction.

Notes for editors:

1. The international research journal, Building Research and Information, commissioned seven papers from leading experts:

  • Design of humanitarian tents for use in cold climates by P Mansfield, J Ashmore and T Corsellis.

  • Residential building damage and natural perils: Australian examples and issues by R Blong.

  • Risk and regulation: can improved government action reduce the impacts of natural disasters? by R Spence.

  • Public policy for reducing earthquake risks: a US perspective: by M C Comerio.

  • Adapting traditional shelter for disaster mitigation and reconstruction: experiences with community-based approaches by T Schilderman.

  • Allocation of post-disaster reconstruction financing to housing by P K Freeman.

  • Managing and interpreting uncertainty for climate change risk by R R White.

2. The special issue Building Research and Information (ISSN 0961-3218, volume 32, number 5) entitled "Managing the Risks from Natural Hazards" was published October 1 2004. The Editor is:

Richard Lorch
E: r.lorch@ukonline.co.uk
T: +44 (0)207 609 4311
W: www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09613218.html

3. The guest editors for the special issue were: Professor Robin Spence and Dr Ilan Kelman from the Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/curbe:

Professor Spence
T: 01223 460475
E: rspence@carltd.com

Dr Kelman
T: 01223 331715 [no longer valid; see http://www.ilankelman.org/contact.html]
E: ik227@cam.ac.uk [no longer valid; see http://www.ilankelman.org/contact.html]

4. Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) was established in 1997 to create a structure for interdisciplinary collaboration for disaster and risk research and application. Projects link the skills and expertise from distinct disciplines to understand and resolve disaster and risk issues, particularly related to reducing detrimental impacts of disasters. CURBE is based at the Martin Centre within the Department of Architecture at the University of Cambridge in eastern England. Close ties are maintained with many commercial and industrial partners to ensure practical and useful outputs from the research.

For further information, please contact:

Karen Dean, Press and Publications Office
University of Cambridge
Tel: 01223 332300; email: kjd42@cam.ac.uk

Guayquil, Ecuador.
Guayaquil, Ecuador: Are risks mitigated or exacerbated by separating less affluent and more affluent communities?
(Copyright Ilan Kelman 2004.)
See more Guayaquil photos at http://www.ilankelman.org/guayaquil.html


Contact Ilan.


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